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Khawla Successfully Performs Complex Head Operation for Child

Khawla Successfully Performs Complex Head Operation for Child

Khawla Successfully Performs Complex Head Operation for Child

23/2/2020

The Craniofacial surgery team at the Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Craniofacial Surgery at Khawla Hospital performed successfully a complex head surgery for a two-year-old child.

The child was suffering from Craniosynostosis, a condition in which one or more of the fibrous sutures in an infant skull prematurely fuses by turning into bone (ossification), thereby changing the growth pattern of the skull. As a result, there will be no enough space for the growing brain, the premature closure of the sutures leads to increased intracranial pressure, which leads to poor eyesight, developmental delay, sleep difficulties, and poor mental development with a decrease IQ.

Dr. Taimoor Al Bulushi, Head of Plastic, Reconstructive and Craniofacial Surgery and head of craniofacial unit at Khawla Hospital, said that these cases are rare and occur in one in every 2000 births. It is part of a syndrome in 15 to 40% of patients, but usually occurs as isolated cases.

There are many reasons for the occurrence of such distortions, including genetic and environmental, and a genetic study of genes can be done to find out the type of syndrome and the reasons for its occurrence. These syndromes may be accompanied by other birth defects in other parts of the body, depending on the type of syndrome, added Dr. Al Bulushi.

Dr. Taimoor pointed out that the increase in intracranial pressure in children suffering from craniosynostosis causes excessive crying due to the resulting headache and vomiting after eating, especially in the morning period, so these operations must be performed and the shape of the skull must be corrected before the child completes his first year because in this age the bones of the skull are easy to shape and placed in the natural shape to grow back naturally.

The condition of this child was complicated, as all the sutures were fused, which led to an increase in intracranial pressure. Therefore, the operation was carried out in two phases. In the first stage, the posterior part of the skull was corrected and expanded, in the second stage after 6 months the anterior part of the skull was corrected and expanded, and the two operations were done successfully.

Carrying out these surgeries requires preparation and a treatment plan to be agreed upon by the craniofacial surgical team and neurosurgeons in advance of the surgery, and performing such operations requires a multidisciplinary team of craniofacial surgeons, neurosurgeons in addition to anesthesiologists and trained nursing staff with experience to perform these surgeries.

It is worth noting that more than 75 of these cases were performed in Khawla Hospital and all of them were successful. Remarkably, such cases in the past were sent for treatment abroad at state expense in specialized centers and one case costs more than 100 thousand US dollars, however today these operations are taking place with great success in the Sultanate.

The craniofacial surgery team in the Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Craniofacial Surgery at Khawla Hospital performs all other craniofacial surgeries, including cleft lip and palate, craniofacial bone fractures, craniofacial cancers, correction of skull bone deficiency as a result of an injury or tumor that has been removed or any other reason as well as the other known craniofacial surgeries.